Wednesday, February 13th, 2013 Focus: When people are bugging me, I ask myself, ‘What can I do that will help them?’

Our natural expression is Love. Any other expression we find ourselves in is just a warp of our true identity.

One of the great things I learned from Tibetan Buddhism is that we pursue enlightenment not for ourselves, but so we can help others wake up, help others move beyond their suffering and difficulty. This value is quite different than what we have here in our culture where we think mostly in terms of ‘I’m better than you are’ or ‘I’m going to be enlightened before you are.’

There’s a great, great Buddhist practice of praying that others will wake up before you do. Boy! Does this ever change your relationship with the people who are bugging you! You begin to ask, ‘What can I do that will help them?’ It’s a very powerful meditation.

Excerpted from the article:   
No One Is An Island: We Are Companions, Not Competitors  —  by Margaret Wolff.

Sunday, February 3rd, 2013 Focus: Nothing in my mind or in my dreams is real.

Observe how the thoughts, beliefs, and stories, just like the feelings and emotions they trigger, are ever-changing, appearing and disappearing, but you are the awareness that is always present, always here. So, breathe and be the clear, unchanging awareness you are . . .

When you do this practice enough, you eventually realize that what you are is simply clear, radiant, present-time awareness itself. When you are no longer identifying so much with the contents of your mind — with thoughts, beliefs, and stories — you are freer of emotional stress and reactivity, and you experience more ease and harmony.

However, in order to pass through the final door to awakening or inner freedom, you have to use this practice to face everything in yourself, including all your demons. You have to face fear itself. If you truly face it and stay with it long enough, you’ll discover it isn’t real. Nothing in your mind or in your dreams is real. Only what is timeless, changeless, and always here is real.

Excerpted from the article:
A Dog Named Love & A Dog Named Fear: Which Are You Feeding?  —  by Jim Dreaver.

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Friday, February 3rd, 2012 Focus: I let go of the need to control other people.

The only thing we have control over is our choice to either react mindlessly or respond mindfully to “what is” in the current moment. To practice the art of uncertainty is to let go of the need to control the actions and behavior of other people, including their opinions of us.

It also means understanding that we have no control over the future, what “should or shouldn’t” happen tomorrow, but at the same time, it means developing an inner knowing that everything will be all right.

Sometimes we avoid seeing the truth that lies behind our fear because then we’ll have to deal with that reality. However, there is something very empowering about turning and facing our fear and shedding new light on it. Once exposed to the light, the things we fear seem to lose their power to scare us.

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Excerpted from: The Illusion of Control: Seeking Security
by Dennis Merritt Jones.

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