Monday, March 31st, 2014 Focus: Now is the time in my life to tell the Inner Critic to take a rest and let me be who I am.

Awesome
We all face the Inner Critic, that voice that tells us we’re too clumsy to dance, too tone deaf to sing, too immature to write, and so forth. The Inner Critic has an opinion about more than just your creations: it’s the same voice that tells us we’re not good or talented enough to follow our dreams.

Was there a dream you had before life became so formed? What did you desire, when you were uninhibited and still thought anything was possible? Was there a moment when you were told you could not do something? Perhaps someone told you that you could not draw a straight line or to stay between the lines as you colored. Perhaps someone told you that you were too ugly or clumsy to dance, that you could not sing on key or play piano, or that you were lazy and did not practice enough.

Now is the time in your life to tell the Critic to take a rest and let you be who you are. This is a crucial step to creativity in general, basic in the art and healing process — a judgment-free, loving, and supportive process. You do it to heal yourself, others, and the earth, and this is what makes it truly beautiful.

Excerpted from the article:
It’s Time to Meet Your Inner Artist & Release Your Inner Critic
by Michael Samuels, MD and Mary Rockwood Lane, PhD.

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RECOMMENDED BOOK OF THE DAY

Healing with the Arts: A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community — by Michael Samuels M.D. and Mary Rockwood Lane Ph.D.

Through art projects — including visual arts, dance, writing, and music — along with spiritual practices and guided imagery, Healing With the Arts gives readers the tools to heal physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual ailments. Acclaimed by hospitals and caretakers from around the world, Healing With the Arts brings a proven 12-week program out of the medical community and into your home and neighborhood. Internationally known leaders in the arts in medicine movement, authors Michael Samuels, MD, and Mary Rockwood Lane, RN, PhD, use creativity and self-expression to pave a path to healing. Whether using it to improve your personal health or the health of your community, join the thousands of people who have already awoken their innate healing ability through art.

Click here for more info and/or to order this book on Amazon.
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Saturday, March 29th, 2014 Focus: I take a deep breath and allow myself to imagine all of my potentials.

einstein
Potentials are bubbles of experiences that you can choose from. They’re almost unlimited, and when you use your imagination, you feel into those potentials. Then you can determine which ones you’re going to choose.

Yes, there are certain desires, things you would like to experience in a life­time, but they are just potentials. And you can change those potentials any time you want. How do you do it? You imagine into them, and then you choose.

Some of the greatest inventors, scientists, and thinkers were also the greatest imaginers. They went beyond their minds. They imagined. It’s one of the most potent tools you have, and one of the easiest tools to use. Imagination and choice create reality. Take a deep breath and allow yourself to imagine. Imagine openly, freely, wildly.

Excerpted from the article:
Incorporating Your Five Angelic Senses with Your Five Human Senses
by Geoffrey Hoppe, Linda Hoppe, and Adamus Saint-Germain.

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RECOMMENDED BOOK OF THE DAY

Live Your Divinity: Inspirations for New Consciousness
by Adamus Saint-Germain (transmitted by Geoffrey Hoppe and Linda Hoppe).

In Live Your Divinity, the wisdom of Adamus comes through loud and clear in the plain-talking voice of Geoffrey Hoppe. Culled from Adamus’s messages given before live audiences around the world, these excerpts relay that, ultimately, personal growth and spiritual development can only be realized through an increased awareness of the very experience the reader is already having on their path of awakening.

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March 28, 2014-Bill White -NO MORE GRADUATIONS

universe
The acute care (AC) model of intervention that, with few exceptions, has dominated the modern treatment of addiction involves a brief–and seemingly ever-briefer–period of professionalintervention followed by cessation of the service relationship. As addiction professionals working within this model, we are trained to screen, assess, admit, treat and discharge each person we serve. And as we approach the end of this sequence, we are trained to address “termination” issues in the counseling relationship, prepare “discharge” plans and, in many of our settings, participate in a “graduation” ritual that signals the end of primary treatment and the service relationship.
Nothing more personifies the AC model than this graduation ceremony–a ritual often cherished by patients and staff alike. The ritual reminds one of a group of individuals involved in some mass catastrophe all treated together to form a powerful community of survivors who then leave one at a time with each saying warm goodbyes to their fellow travelers and their caregivers. There is a sense for those leaving via this “graduation” ritual that they can now get on with their lives and not look back. Chapter closed.
This AC model works well with acute trauma, and it can play a role for many in addiction recovery initiation and stabilization. Unfortunately, it does not work well with the treatment of addictions of high severity, complexity and chronicity–patterns that dominate admissions to specialized addiction treatment units. Brief episodes of crisis intervention do not support the transition from recovery initiation and stabilization through the stages of recovery maintenance and enhanced quality of personal and family life in long-term recovery.
Efforts to transform AC models of intervention into models of sustained recovery management analogous to the treatment of other life-threatening chronic health conditions require substantial changes in service practices. One such critical change is abandonment of the graduation ritual or reframing this ritual as something other than the “end” of treatment. No healthcare provider would think of providing a “graduation” ceremony marking the discharge of patients admitted for crisis care of diabetes, heart disease, asthma, chronic respiratory conditions or chronic pain because such interventions would not constitute the end of care and the service relationship. Discharging persons from primary addiction treatment should also not signal the end of care. It is time we altered practices that inadvertently convey this end of care message.
Rituals of transition have their place in addiction treatment but they should signal new beginnings–the transitions into or through addiction recovery, not something that has been completed.
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Wednesday, March 26th, 2014 Focus: The more I cultivate patience, the less anger I carry.

Toni

Toni


Not all anger is bad. We should never put up with exploitation or abuse, and our impatience in that regard is a healthy warning signal that our limits have been violated and we need to seek a safe haven.

When we employ patience, we are much better judges of when it is time to rise up in righteous anger and when we should grin and bear something.

There’s an Irish proverb that goes something like this: “When you are angry, you’re carrying the burden while the other person is out dancing.” The more we cultivate patience, the less anger we carry and the more dancing we’ll feel like doing.

Excerpted from the article:
The Gift of Patience: Patience Guards the Door to Anger
by M.J. Ryan.

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RECOMMENDED BOOK OF THE DAY

The Power of Patience: How This Old-Fashioned Virtue Can Improve Your Life — by M.J. Ryan.

In The Power of Patience, M. J. Ryan teaches us how to slow the rush and reclaim the forgotten virtue of patience on a daily basis. She shows how doing so allows us to make better decisions and to feel better about ourselves every day. The Power of Patience calls on us to reclaim our time, our priorities, and our ability to respond to life with a firmly grounded sense of who we are. It is the best gift that we can give ourselves.

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March 21, 2014Bill White – SHEDDING SKINS IN RECOVERY

http://www.williamwhitepapers.com/blog/2014/03/shedding-skins-in-recovery.html
For years, the following quote has rested over my writing desk: “The Phoenix does not mourn what lies in its ashes; the serpent does not mourn its old skin.”–Arthur Frank
Addiction recovery involves a progressive unpeeling of the self and focused efforts of self-construction. It is helpful in thinking of this to distinguish between remission and recovery. Remission of an illness can involve little more than the removal of symptoms and a return to the earlier trajectory of one’s existence. In this sense, remission is regressive–a return to an earlier level of functioning. In contrast, recovery can involve a reformulation of self and a fundamentally altered trajectory of one’s life. In fact, long-term addiction recovery often involves serial reincarnations of the self. I’ve described this process earlier as one of shedding the masks of addiction and recovery.
The metaphor of masks captures the duplicity and imposterhood that often rests at the experiential core of addiction, but these masks could also be thought of as onion-like skins. The notion of skins conveys a deeper level of connection and something that cannot be as easily attached or removed–something closer to what many reptiles experience as they mature. Skins can be thought of as the disturbed thoughts, feelings, actions and traits of character one brings into the recovery process and the burdens of past actions carried into one’s effort to construct a new life. Such baggage must be peeled away to free one to walk upright and to face others and face oneself. To shed old skins, forge one’s mature skin and to live comfortably within that skin are essential tasks of addiction recovery.
The old stained self cannot be retrospectively changed–we cannot rewrite past history, but it can be shed in the present through a sudden transformative change experience or through a prolonged process of awakening and growth. Both processes involve periods of incubation and sustained action. We must nurture and protect the circumstances that allow such incubation and action, but we must also be patient and willing to live in the present through each stage of this process. The goal is not to reach some ultimate state of being, but rather to live within and finding meaning and contribution to others within this evolutionary process. We don’t go through this process to live fully in its final stages; the meaning is instead found within each step in the process.
Each new self requires a period of incubation and growth before the next incarnation can emerge. You can think and feel your way through this process, but ultimately you must act your way through it. Like the snake, we must shudder, slough and scrape off layers of the old self to stimulate new growth. This is a journey through “act as if” (and the feelings of imposterhood that this “fake-it-til-you-make-it” stage elicits) to a state of acting out of an aspirational core with full awareness and acceptance of one’s continued imperfection. We must embrace each new skin without getting too attached to it–with full knowledge that this newly drying self will also one day be shed. I think this idea of shedding skins as a process of maturation has value in helping understand the personal transformations that can unfold in long-term recovery.
What prompted this meditation was encountering the following words within one of my favorite author’s latest novels–Walter Mosely’s Odyssey (2013):
“The snake is possibly the luckiest of all creatures…He sheds his skin, goes into hiding because his new scales are sensitive, and then comes out into life leaving behind his old bonds and pains…The snake doesn’t look at the husk and call it a waste. He simply feels the exhilaration of freedom and the strangeness of transformation.”

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Saturday, March 22nd, 2014 Focus: I shift out of thoughts that weaken me, and choose instead higher frequency thoughts that empower me.

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Every single thought you have can be assessed in terms of whether it strengthens or weakens you. Authentic wisdom is the ability to monitor yourself at all times to determine your relative state of weakness or strength, and to shift out of those thoughts that weaken you. In this way, you keep yourself in an upbeat, higher state of consciousness, and you prevent your thoughts from weakening every single organ of your body.

Your health is determined largely by the thoughts you have. Passionately think that you won’t get a cold, and your body will react to your thoughts. Refuse to entertain thoughts of fatigue, jet lag, or headaches, and your body responds to your thoughts.

When you shift from a thought that’s a very low energy vibration to one of a higher frequency, you go from weak to strong. When your thought is on blaming others, you’re weakened. But when you shift to loving and trusting others, you become strong. Your thoughts come with an accompanying energy, so you might as well shift to those that empower you.

Excerpted from the article:
Authentic Wisdom: Shifting Out of Thoughts That Weaken You
by Dr. Wayne Dyer.

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RECOMMENDED BOOK OF THE DAY

10 Secrets for Success and Inner Peace
by Wayne W. Dyer.

10 Secrets for Success and Inner Peace by Wayne W. Dyer. In this thought-provoking book, Dr. Dyer offers simple ways to change your life — and your outlook on life. The ten principles presented here apply to people who are just beginning their journey of discovery, as well as those who have already embarked on life’s winding path. Dr. Dyer urges us to listen with an open heart, and to apply the secrets that resonate with them and discard the rest. By doing so, we’ll learn to feel the peace of God that truly defines success.

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Friday, March 21st, 2014 Focus: As I let go of the past, I become free to enjoy this moment and to create a great future.

Right Brain
Many people come to me and say they cannot enjoy today because of something that happened in the past. Because they did not do something or do it in a certain way in the past, they cannot live a full life today… Because they no longer have something they had in the past, they cannot enjoy today… Because they were hurt in the past, they will not accept love now… Because of some very old experience where they were treated badly, they will never forgive and forget…

The past is over and done and cannot be changed. Holding on to the past, no matter what it was or how awful it was, is ONLY HURTING US. We are only hurting ourselves by refusing to live in this moment to the fullest. This is the only moment we can experience.

Let us now clean up the past in our minds. Release the emotional attachment to it. Allow the memories to be just memories. As we let go, we become free to use all of our mental power to enjoy this moment and to create a great future.

Excerpted from the article:
Held Back By Your Past: Letting Go & Setting Yourself Free
by Louise Hay.

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