Sunday, December 18th, 2011 TODAY’S FOCUS: My daily commitment is kindness. I ask myself: Am I being kind?

INNERSELF.COM – DAILY INSPIRATION:

The Dalai Lama once said, “My religion is very simple. My religion is kindness.” What a simple yet profound creed! As a way of life and our daily intention, this commitment becomes our greatest vehicle for consistently experiencing happiness and the energy of love.

By asking, “am I being kind toward others, the earth, and myself?” you’ll find it possible to stay on a genuine path of kinder living. There will be days when it’s difficult to adhere to this philosophy, to say the least. Existing in a world that often feels complex and stressful, most people simply can’t sustain this practice 100 percent of the time.

Go easy on yourself. If you feel that you’re currently living 30 percent from your heart and 70 percent from your head, and tomorrow you increase to 31 percent from your heart, that’s wonderful! Your only goal should be to improve and move forward each day. Of course, the more you grow, the happier and more at peace you’ll become; but it doesn’t benefit you to spend time judging or, especially, comparing yourself to those around you. Just make it your intention each day to consciously do a little more for others, and watch how quickly your life begins to change.

 

Excerpted from the article:
LivingKindness: The Religion of Kindness
by Michael J. Chase.
CLICK HERE TO READ THE ARTICLE
<a href=”http://www.innerself.com/content/self-help/behavior-modification/attitudes/6949-livingkindness-the-religion-of-kindness.html“>AOL click here</a>

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TODAY’S FOCUS: I choose the music I listen to so it can help me heal and relax.

INNERSELF.COM – DAILY INSPIRATION:

A multitude of sounds engulfs us every day. What is it about music that is so enticing? Is it the resonance? The melodious song soothes us. The electrical impulses in our brain have shifted to what is called the Alpha State. The entire system relaxes.

Tibetan monks chant three times a day to a critically injured snow leopard that gradually and miraculously heals. Or is it a miracle? Both clinical research and historical experience teach us that music heals and helps us to relax. It stimulates immune function.

Music is a gift of the universe that heals us, motivates us, calms us, and softens us. It keeps us company. It helps us to grieve and to rejoice. Because music is such a powerful force, we need to be conscious about it. Not all music is good for us.

Excerpted from the article:
Choose Music, Choose Life
by Beverly M. Breakey.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE ARTICLE
<a href=”http://innerself.com/content/healthy/general-health/5275-choose-music-choose-life.html“>AOL click here</a>

 

Today’s Editorial from Portland Press Herald

Gov. Paul LePage likes to talk about personal responsibility, but his proposal to gut the state’s health care safety net is irresponsible, through and through.

Joe Phelan/Kennebec Journal

Dumping 65,000 people off government programs might lighten the state budget in the short run, but it will inevitably shift costs onto hospitals, which will provide uncompensated emergency room care, and  then onto businesses and individuals, who will have to pay higher health insurance premiums.

These cuts would also result in the state losing federal funds, which match state dollars at a 2-to-1 rate. Under the LePage plan, that money would stop coming into Maine to support doctors, nurses, pharmacies, clinics, group homes and other businesses in the for-profit and nonprofit sectors of our economy.

It is hard to see how the governor could say with a straight face that this plan is an “effort to fix” the state’s high health care costs “once and for all.”

Instead, he appears to be using a crisis to further his pre-cooked political agenda that starts by demonizing poor people. It’s a message LePage has been trying to sell since he came to office: Health care costs are too high, he argues because the people who receive services don’t need them or deserve them.

Fortunately, LePage only represents one branch of government, and the Legislature – and perhaps the judicial branch – will have a say before these cuts can go into effect.

Even the Republican-controlled Legislature did not approve many of these same ideas when they were included in the budget passed in June. It would seem unlikely that their leaders would want to begin an election year by cutting off funding for programs that help people in need, such as the aid senior citizens use to buy prescription drugs. Lawmakers also may find it difficult to explain why it makes sense to trade higher health insurance premiums for lower state health care costs.

It will also be hard to explain why it makes sense to cut the MaineCare budget by eliminating funding that supports 4,000 assisted living residents, who would likely have to move to much more expensive nursing home beds, which also are part of the MaineCare budget.

Gov. LePage says he has asked lawmakers to put aside their differences and work together to solve this crisis. He should take his own advice and start the process over with a more responsible plan.

___________________________________

Today’s Editorial from Kennebec Journal

posted: December 8
Updated: Today at 12:06 AM

OUR OPINION: LePage got our attention; now how about a real plan?

Gutting MaineCare not responsible

Gov. Paul LePage likes to talk about personal responsibility, but his proposal to gut MaineCare, the state’s health care safety net, is irresponsible, through and through.

Dumping 65,000 people off government programs might lighten the state budget in the short run, but it will inevitably shift costs onto hospitals, which will provide uncompensated emergency room care, and then onto businesses and individuals, who will have to pay higher health insurance premiums.

These cuts also would result in the state losing federal funds, which match state dollars at a 2-to-1 rate. Under the LePage plan, that money would stop coming into Maine to support doctors, nurses, pharmacies, clinics, group homes and other businesses in the for-profit and nonprofit sectors of our economy.

It is hard to see how the governor could say with a straight face that this plan is an “effort to fix” the state’s high health care costs “once and for all.”

Instead, he appears to be using a crisis to further his pre-cooked political agenda, which starts by demonizing poor people.

It’s a message LePage has been trying to sell since he came to office: Health care costs are too high, he argues, because the people who receive services don’t need them or deserve them.

Fortunately, LePage only represents one branch of government, and the Legislature — and perhaps the judicial branch — will have a say before these cuts can go into effect.

Even the Republican-controlled Legislature did not pass many of these same ideas when they were included in the budget passed in June.

It would seem unlikely that their leaders would want to begin an election year by cutting off funding for programs that help people in need such as the aid senior citizens use to buy prescription drugs.

Lawmakers also may find it difficult to explain why it makes sense to trade higher health insurance premiums for lower state health care costs.

It also will be hard to explain why it makes sense to cut the MaineCare budget by eliminating funding that supports 4,000 assisted living residents, who likely would have to move to much more expensive nursing home beds, which also are part of the MaineCare budget.

LePage says he has asked lawmakers to put aside their differences and work together to solve this crisis. He should take his own advice and start the process over with a more responsible plan.