Thursday, December 18th, 2014 Focus: I choose to face the source of stress in my life and deal creatively with it.

The importance of finding balance in our lives, where we are at peace with our worlds, is paramount. We owe it to ourselves and those we love to take care of our physical, inner and spiritual needs responsibly. Animals who are closely knit with their human families experience extreme stress when their humans do. Often, the disease and trauma that humans hold in their bodies manifests physically in their animal’s bodies and behavior.

If we, as human caretakers of our worlds, do not honestly face our fears and life challenges, and communicate our feelings about them to each other, we hold them imprisoned in our bodies. There they stay, under the lock and key of our emotions. Left unresolved, these feelings begin to break down the physical body, from the energetic matrix of the cells outward, until disharmony and disease ultimately manifest.

The entire process has toxic impact on our environment, particularly at home where we relax and let down our guard. Companion animals that sleep with their human family can be extremely susceptible to the psychic discharge during dreamtime that is released by people with unresolved emotional issues. This potent negative energy is as pervasive and deadly to animals as poison is to humans. Until we face the source of stress in our lives and deal creatively with it, it will have negative impact on us, on our worlds, our families and our animals.

Excerpted from the article:
Is Your Stress Affecting Your Pets and Those You Love?
Written by Sage Holloway.

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RECOMMENDED BOOK OF THE DAY

Animal Healing and Vibrational Medicine
by Sage Holloway.

Animal Healing and Vibrational Medicine by Sage Holloway. A resource and reference guide for over 1,000 energetic remedies for animals. You will find remedies for moving anxiety, stress from specialized and obedience training, for animals who live predominantly indoors, and remedies for injuries, infestations, exposure to toxins, and many more!

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Tuesday, December 16th, 2014 Focus: I give attention to the present; to my behavior, reactions, moods, thoughts, emotions, fears, and desires as they occur in the present.

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Only the present can free you of the past. Access the power of Now. That is the key. The power of Now is none other than the power of your presence, your consciousness liberated from thought forms. So deal with the past on the level of the present.

The more attention you give to the past, the more you energize it, and the more likely you are to make a “self” out of it. Don’t misunderstand: Attention is essential, but not to the past as past. Give attention to the present; give attention to your behavior, to your reactions, moods, thoughts, emotions, fears, and desires as they occur in the present. There’s the past in you.

If you can be present enough to watch all those things, not critically or analytically but non-judgmentally, then you are dealing with the past and dissolving it through the power of your presence. You cannot find yourself by going into the past. You find yourself by coming into the present.

Excerpted from the article:
Be “Here” Totally, Rather Than Thinking About “There”
Written by Eckhart Tolle.

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RECOMMENDED BOOK OF THE DAY

Practicing the Power of Now: Essential Teachings, Meditations, and Exercises From The Power of Now
by Eckhart Tolle.

This book extracts the essence from Eckhart Tolle’s teachings in The Power of Now, showing us how to free ourselves from “enslavement to the mind.” The aim is to be able to enter into and sustain an awakened state of consciousness throughout everyday life. Through meditations and simple techniques, Eckhart shows us how to quiet our thoughts, see the world in the present moment, and find a path to “a life of grace, ease, and lightness.”

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Sunday, December 14th, 2014 Focus: I have the ability to comfortably refuse unreasonable or inconvenient requests.

Sumerian-Tablet
While it is great to be able to give help to others when they genuinely need it, where do we draw the line? Does being compassionate mean we must bend over backward when others ask us to or that we must assist in solving everyone’s problems or gratifying their desires? Definitely not.

When helping others causes problems for us, it is time for a careful review of ourselves and our objectives. Life is infinitely more pleasant when we possess the ability to comfortably refuse unreasonable or inconvenient requests.

If we’d like to refuse obligations that aren’t really ours and want to avoid feeling angry and resentful when people don’t respect our needs, we must keep one important fact in mind: If we don’t acknowledge and respect ourselves and our needs, neither will anyone else.

Excerpted from the article:
Helping Out: When A Little Help For Your Friends is Just Too Much
Written by Jerry Minchinton.

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RECOMMENDED BOOK OF THE DAY

The Light: A Book of Wisdom: How to Lead an Enlightened Life Filled with Love, Joy, Truth, and Beauty
by Keidi Keating.

This powerful book contains chapters by 22 of the world’s leading luminaries in the field of personal development and spiritual transformation, including bestselling authors Neale Donald Walsch (Conversations With God) and Don Miguel Ruiz (The Four Agreements). Covering topics from co-creating a peaceful world, forgiveness, healing, and finding purpose and happiness, to chapters about health, well-being, destiny, and the mysteries of kundalini, The Light also includes practical exercises and guidance, empowering readers to achieve their greatest potential.

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BLOG & NEW POSTINGS December 13, 2014Bill White – THE ROOTS OF RECOVERY MANAGEMENT


One of the milestones in the modern treatment of addiction has been the reconceptualization of addiction as a chronic disorder on par with other chronic health problems. This seemingly fresh perspective suggested that approaches found to be effective in the management of diabetes, cancer, heart disease, asthma, and other chronic disorders might be effectively adapted to increase long-term addiction recovery outcomes. Criticism of the concept of addiction as a chronic disorder have focused on its potential to increase addiction-related stigma (Brown, 1998) and misrepresent the more typical trajectory of alcohol and other drug problems (Cunningham & McCambridge, 2012). Such criticisms underscore the need for refinement of the addiction as chronic disorder messaging (White and McLellan, 2008) that has become a central tenet of calls to shift addiction treatment from models of acute care to models of sustained recovery management nested within larger recovery-oriented systems of care. Recovery management is a philosophy of organizing addiction treatment and recovery support services to enhance precovery engagement, recovery initiation and stabilization, recovery maintenance, quality of personal/family life in long-term recovery, and efforts to break intergenerational cycles of addiction and related problems.
In recounting the modern history of the addictions field, I have suggested that the “tipping point” in this understanding of addiction chronicity was the publication of a seminal article by Tom McLellan, David Lewis, Charles O’Brien, and Herbert Kleber in 2000 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Today’s blog, for the history geeks among us, identifies some of the earlier milestones in this understanding of addiction as a chronic disorder.
1828: “Chronic diseases require chronic cures” (p. 295). Kain, J.H. (1828). On intemperance considered as a disease and susceptible of cure. American Journal of Medical Science, 2:291-295.
1879: “The permanent cure of inebriates under treatment in asylums will compare favorably in numbers with that of any other disease of the nervous system which is more or less chronic before the treatment is commenced.” Crothers, T.D. (1879). Editorial: Practical value of inebriate asylums. Journal of Inebriety, 3(4), 249
1892: “The same principles apply in the treatment of this disease (alcoholism) that apply in all chronic nervous diseases” (p. 288). Enfield, A. (1892). Alcoholism: A disease. Journal of the American Medical Association 18, 287-289.
1913: “Chronic alcoholism is not only a disease itself, but in many instances it springs from other diseases and it is certain that other diseases grow out of it” (p. 435). Pettey, George E. (MD) (1913). Narcotic drug diseases and allied ailments. Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Company.
1938: “An alcoholic should be regarded as a sick person, just as one who is suffering from tuberculosis, cancer, heart disease, or other serious chronic disorder” (p. 244). Report of the Scientific Committee of the Research Council on Problems of Alcohol, cited in Johnson, B. (1973). The alcoholism movement in America: A study in cultural innovation. Urbana, Illinois: University of Illinois Ph.D. Dissertation.
1947: “…it [alcoholism] is a chronic affair; chronic conditions must be approached on a long range basis” (p. 11). Duncan, R.E. (1947). Alcohol as a medical problem. Kansas City Medical Journal, 23(6), 9-12.
1951: Alcoholism must be approached “as much a disease as diabetes or tuberculosis” Charles Franco, quoted in: Duncan, S.C. (1951). Chronic alcoholism as a medical problem in industry.Industrial Medicine & Surgery, 20(12), 47-50.
1959: “The appellative ‘chronic,’ [attached to alcoholism] however, constitutes a redundancy, as pointed out by Dittmer (1932); the suffix ‘ism’ in itself indicates a persistent state” (p. 230). Marconi, J. (1959). The concept of alcoholism. Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 20(2), 216-235.
1983: “First, since alcoholism is a chronic relapsing disease, follow-up must be prolonged–at least 5-15 years” (p. 148). “Once it develops, alcoholism is a chronic disorder. Insidious, fulminating, and intermittent courses are all common; so is recovery” (p. 309). Vaillant, G. (1983). The natural history of alcoholism: Causes, patterns, and paths to recovery. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.
1986: “Without question, alcoholism is a chronic condition; it is disabling; it is unpredictable; there is no possibility of cure; the illness determines one’s lifestyle; the causes and symptoms are ambiguous and unpredictable; there is shame and guilt; there is obvious loss of control; and certainly most alcoholics and family members feel like they are bearing the unbearable” (p. 28).
“The fundamental goal in alcoholism treatment is to help the patient and significant others learn to make certain necessary, and sometimes major, lifestyle changes which will help them live with an incurable chronic illness” (p. 27). “It is my impression that, for some people at least, chronic illness can be a transforming experience, even a new pathway to wholeness and health.” p. 30 Anderson, D. (1986). Living with a chronic illness. Center City, MN: Hazelden Foundation.
1990: “Alcoholism is a primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations.” American Society of Addiction Medicine & National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence. (1990). Disease Definition of Alcoholism Revised. Joint News Release, April 26.
1996: “Although addictions are chronic disorders, there is a tendency for most physicians and for the general public to perceive them as being acute conditions such as a broken leg or pneumococcal pneumonia” (p. 237). In comparing addiction to adult-onset diabetes, asthma and hypertension, “All are multiply determined, and no single gene, personality variable, or environmental factor can fully account for the onset of any of these disorders. Behavioral choices seem to be implicated in the initiation of each of them, and behavioral control continues to be a factor in determining their course and severity. There are no ‘cures’ for any of them, yet there have been major advances in the development of effective medications and behavioral change regimens to reduce or eliminate primary symptoms. Because these conditions are chronic, it is acknowledged…that maintenance treatments will be needed to ensure that symptoms remission continues” (p. 239). “Treatment of addiction is about as successful as treatment of disorders such as hypertension, diabetes, and asthma…” (p. 239). “Is it not time that we judged the ‘worth’ of treatment for chronic addiction with the same standards that we use for treatments of other chronic diseases?” (p. 240). O’Brien, C.P. & McLellan, A.T. (1996). Myths about the treatment of Addiction. Lancet, 347:237-240.
1997: “…addiction is a chronic, relapsing disorder, rather than simply a series of discreet, short-term drug-using episodes” (p. 691). Leshner, A.I. (1997). Drug abuse and addiction treatment research: The next generation. Archives of General Psychiatry, 54, 691-694
DrugDependence_Article_letter-72ppi.jpg2000: “In terms of vulnerability, onset, and course, drug dependence is similar to other chronic illnesses, such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and asthma” (p. 1693). “…it is essential that practitioners adapt the care and medical monitoring strategies currently used in the treatment of other chronic illnesses to the treatment of drug dependence” (p. 1694). McLellan, A.T., Lewis, D.C., O’Brien, C.P., and Kleber, H. (2000). Drug dependence, a chronic medical illness: Implications for treatment, insurance, and outcomes evaluation. Journal of the American Medical Association, 284(13), 1689-1695.
For my own views on how the most severe, complex and prolonged patterns of addiction would be treated if they were fully understood as a chronic disorder, see my monograph, Recovery Management and Recovery-Oriented Systems of Care: Scientific Rationale and Promising Practices.

Wednesday, December 10th, 2014 Focus: I choose to treat my body with kindness, affection, and love.Wednesday, December 10th, 2014 Focus: I choose to treat my body with kindness, affection, and love.

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In learning to let go of the tension, worry, and stress inside you, you’ll start to feel a whole lot better physically, and you’ll have more energy. It is psychological and emotional stress that’s the real killer — much more so than eating the occasional fatty meal or not exercising for a week or two.

You’ll also be much less worried about or afraid of what is happening in your body. People fear unusual sensations or sudden changes in their bodily experience because they don’t have a relationship with their bodies.

The best way to help your body do its job of keeping itself in balance is to develop a good relationship with it. That means to stop ignoring it, stop judging it, and start treating it with kindness, affection, and love just as you would a person you really cared about.

Excerpted from the article:
Relax and Learn to Release Tension, Anxiety, and Stress
Written by Jim Dreaver.

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RECOMMENDED BOOK OF THE DAY

The Way of Harmony: Walking the Inner Path to Balance, Happiness and Success
by Dr. Jim Dreaver.

Inspirational author and speaker Jim Dreaver outlines his unique message of healing and enlightenment, and shares specific tools for transforming your perceptions and attaining the ultimate balance between spiritual well-being and material success.

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Monday, December 8th, 2014 Focus: If I have reconciled fear, I am free. If I accept my life, I am free. If I don’t resist, I am free.

It goes to eleven
If you have reconciled fear, you are free. If you accept your life, you are free. If you don’t resist, you are free.

It’s only the ego that says you have to have a pain-free existence. It’s only the ego that says you shouldn’t die. It’s only the ego that says you have to have glamour and importance. It’s only the ego that says you have to follow the path that it wants you to follow.

It’s nonsense. Life will go the way it goes. And when you don’t fight it, you’re free. The less you fight it, the less anguish and negativity you create.

Excerpted from the article:
How Can I Be Free of Negative and Fearful Thoughts?
Written by Stuart Wilde.

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RECOMMENDED BOOK OF THE DAY

The Secrets of Life (Revised and Updated!)
by Stuart Wilde.

The Secrets of Life (Revised and Updated!)The thoughts and ideas in this book form the basis of Stuart Wilde’s philosophy on how to develop a more liberated mind-set and thus, a more carefree and delightful life. The thoughts and essays are from his best-selling books as well as his unpublished writings. If you want your spiritual concepts “short and sweet,” then this book will suit you perfectly. As Stuart says, “Any philosophy that you can’t haul down to the bank or up to the airport ain’t worth having!”

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Sunday, December 7th, 2014 Focus: I give the people around me the space to make their own “mis-takes”.

In this movie of life, there are many “mis-takes”. Just as in Hollywood, it may take many “takes” to get a scene “just right”, so in life it takes many “mis-takes” to get our life in balance… and everyone is rewriting their script as they go along, making decisions that turn out great, and others that necessitate a change down the road…

Let’s give ourselves and the people around us the room to make mis-takes. After all, no “perfect” invention or “perfect” scene was created on the first try. It took many wrongs to finally get it right. Each of those “wrongs” actually contributed to the end result. Without the mistakes, the “perfect” solution may never have been found.

In the same way that we need to give our children room to make their own “mistakes” so they can learn, we need to give the people in our lives room to make their own “mis-takes” as well. So, maybe by giving the people around us the space to make their mis-takes — without the “benefit” of our judgments and anger — maybe, just maybe, we’ll get to discover the perfection of it all. Happy movie making!

Excerpted from the article:
Being Right: I’m Right, and You’re Wrong!
Written by Marie T. Russell.

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RECOMMENDED BOOK OF THE DAY

The Little Book of Letting Go: A Revolutionary 30-Day Program to Cleanse Your Mind, Lift Your Spirit and Replenish Your Soul
by Hugh Prather & Gerald Jampolsky.

“Letting go is the bottom-line key to happiness,” states Hugh Prather. And in The Little Book of Letting Go, he offers a simple three-step process for shedding prejudices, preconceptions, and prejudgments and facing each moment with openness and enthusiasm. Prather first explains why it is essential to learn to let go and then outlines a 30-day plan for spiritual renewal. Finally, he offers specific techniques for getting a grip on habitual reactions, the need to control, and the addiction to conflict.

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