Saturday, October 25th, 2014 Focus: I am learning to love the present moment.

There are no ordinary moments. This realization, this challenge, lies at the very crux of your life and will determine the quality of your every moment.

Can you, will you, learn to love the present moment? Can you develop the capacity to show each arising moment the same attention that you might give to a cherished friend or a lover — or at least to an online game?

Will you wake up to the inestimable value of each passing moment as it slips, like a grain of sand, through the hourglass of your remaining time here?

Excerpted from the article:
The Entirety of Our Life is a Series of Moments
Written by Dan Millman.

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RECOMMENDED BOOK OF THE DAY

The Four Purposes of Life: Finding Meaning and Direction in a Changing World
by Dan Millman.

The Four Purposes of Life was born from Dan Millman’s decades-long search to make sense of life. He distills decades of experience into a concise map of the journey — the full scope of what we’re each here to accomplish here on planet Earth. It puts together, for the first time, essential elements from the “peaceful warrior teachings” in their full and proper context — providing a burst of clarity to bring our lives into sharper focus.

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Friday, October 24th, 2014 Focus: I can moan, complain, criticize, and blame, or I can take a breath and flow through it.

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Native Americans would purposely burn down certain forests because the area needed cleansing, and the forest that grew back would be healthier. There is a wisdom in apparent destruction, which paves the way for ultimate construction.

I once saw a sign posted at a road construction zone, “The inconvenience is temporary. The improvement is permanent.”

When we are going through a period of temporary inconvenience, we can moan, complain, criticize, and blame, or we can take a breath and flow through it. Just keep watching the ocean, and you will find that the next wave is not far behind the last one.

Excerpted from the article:
The Tide Always Comes Back In
Written by Alan Cohen.

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RECOMMENDED BOOK OF THE DAY

A Daily Dose of Sanity: A Five-Minute Soul Recharge for Every Day of the Year
by Alan Cohen.

You can use this book on a daily basis for a potent uplift and gain valuable tools to feel better, create career and financial success, deepen the quality of all of your relationships, and find personal fulfillment that lifts you far beyond what you’ve known in the past.

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Thursday, October 23rd, 2014 Focus: I have the courage to take risks because, whatever happens, Higher Power is on my side and I will survive.

einstein
Knowing that Source supports you through bringing you people and circumstances that will help you—knowing that you’re an eternal being with marvelous gifts and the magic to co-create a better life for yourself—is the real security.

Faith in the guidance of Spirit gives you the courage to take risks, because you’re assured that whatever happens, a Higher Power is on your side and you will survive.

Spirit provides the allies and the magic wand, but it’s your job to let go of any illusions about controlling the world of your senses and climb into the seat of the Wizard of Awareness, where you can easily recognize genuine security.

Excerpted from the article:
The Desire for Safety, Security and Authenticity
Written by Colette Baron-Reid.

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RECOMMENDED BOOK OF THE DAY

The Map: Finding the Magic and Meaning in the Story of Your Life
by Colette Baron-Reid.

Intuitive counselor Colette Baron-Reid is renowned for helping people create the purposeful and authentic lives they desire. You don’t have to feel lost or disoriented in this time of global transformation, or be at the mercy of the winds of change. The Map invites you to boldly claim your power to direct your journey so that you may find meaning, purpose, and joy. Step into the magic, and harness the extraordinary power within you to shape your destiny.

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Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014 Focus: I open myself to the potential of the moment.

Treat time as a resource – don’t waste it feeling sorry for yourself. Each moment of time approaches us with infinite possibility, summoning us to compassion, understanding and well-being. Can you – will you – open yourself to the potential of the moment?

Time, after all, is the only resource you have to expend against adversity. (Even if you throw money at a problem, for instance, all you’re really doing is buying yourself time saved by having others tackle whatever it is that’s troubling you.)

I implore you not to miss the show that time is putting on for you. Don’t let problems pollute your every twenty-four hour cup of life. To trot out the cliché, money can’t buy happiness may seem trite, but the fact remains that there really are only three things you can do with money: spend it, give it away, or pay taxes.

Excerpted from the article:
Never Enough Time? Each Moment Brings Infinite Possibility
Written by Al Weatherhead.

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RECOMMENDED BOOK OF THE DAY

The Power of Adversity: Tough Times Can Make You Stronger, Wiser, and Better
by Al Weatherhead with Fred Feldman.

With insight and compassion, Al Weatherhead helps us understand that the question we must ask ourselves when bowled over by life’s troubles is not “Why me?” but instead, “Why not me?” In the process, this pragmatic and profound book reveals the secret to achieving a greater understanding and mastery of life by harnessing the Power of Adversity.

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BLOG & NEW POSTINGS October 21, 2014Bill White THE RECOVERY CLOSET: REFLECTIONS ON COMING OUT (PART 2) BILL WHITE, TOM HILL, AND GREG WILLIAMS


This week’s blogs is the third of a continuing meditation on stigma, recovery concealment/disclosure, and its personal and social effects. Here are some random thoughts we would like to share for your reflection.
Social Effects of Concealment Recovery concealment (“passing”) offers some level of protection to the individual, but buttresses the social conditions (e.g., public misperceptions, prejudices, policies, and overt acts of discrimination) that make concealment a necessary option. To be silent about one’s recovery status is at the social/political level an act of conscious or unconscious complicity in addiction/recovery-related stigma. What is unsettling about the agitation of advocacy movements within stigmatized communities is that they bring past and present acts of such complicity into full awareness.
Process versus Event Disclosure of recovery status is not a one-time decision, but a lifelong series of decisions that evolve in tandem with changes in personal, family, and cultural circumstances. Coming out is a continual process requiring sustained commitment.
Simultaneous, Serial, or Selective Disclosure People who share multiple socially stigmatized traits face decisions on which aspects of their life to reveal or continue to conceal and the best timing and contexts of such revelations. Such revelations may occur in a simultaneous, serial (time-spaced decisions–like peeling layers of an onion), or selective (disclosing one dimension while continuing to conceal one or more other dimensions) fashion.
Intimacy/Safety Continuum Recovery disclosure is not an all or none proposition; it often unfolds incrementally based on levels of intimacy and safety and may vary from no disclosure (complete concealment) to minimal disclosure (status of recovery) to maximum disclosure (details of recovery story).
Disclosure Testing Recovery disclosure in interpersonal encounters is best done in stages, with safety and comfort evaluated at each stage.
Disclosure and Recovery Identity Recovery identity is fluid over time, and degrees of disclosure often evolve across the personal/recovery life cycle.
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Disclosure and Personal Privacy Disclosure of a socially stigmatized condition does not imply abandonment of rights to privacy. Each person has the right to disclose or not disclose and to define the boundaries of such disclosure. The decision to share one’s recovery status and the decision to share the details of one’s recovery story are quite different decisions as they represent far different levels of intimacy and vulnerability and require attention to the way in which these different levels of disclosure serve different purposes.
Recovery Storytelling The structure and details of one’s recovery story may change over time as one grows (again, an onion-like peeling of the addiction/recovery experience) and through exposure to the stories of others in recovery.
In-Group Disclosure “A very widely employed strategy of the discreditable person is to handle his risks by dividing the world into a large group to whom he tells nothing, and a small group to whom he tells all and upon whose support he relies on…” (Goffman, Stigma, 1963, p. 95).
Language of Disclosure Recovery disclosure requires a language of disclosure, which one can acquire from others in recovery or from the larger culture when recovery has penetrated cultural consciousness. The in-group jargon of a recovery fellowship may have limited utility for out-group communications to persons without personal/family recovery experience. Such in-group and out-group language–disclosures to people with and without personal recovery experience–often evolve across the stages of recovery, as recovery communities mature, and as social attitudes toward recovery progress or regress. Collective coming out of people across different pathways of recovery requires a new generic language through which the recovery experience can be expressed to the larger public.
Paradox of In-Group Language It is ironic that the majority of people experiencing active addiction shun the “alcoholic or “addict” identity, while hundreds of thousands of people no longer actively addicted regularly introduce themselves as an “alcoholic” or “addict” in meetings of Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous.
In-Group versus Out-Group Communication During the early stages of their cultural/political mobilization, discredited groups may embrace terms of castigation thrust on them by the dominant culture and recast such words as symbols of in-group identification. Historically pejorative language could thus be used for in-group communications at the same time use of this language is being challenged by recovery advocates within the larger culture. Terms like “alcoholic” and “addict” may have great psychological and community-building value within cultures of recovery even as recovery advocates allege that these terms constitute a language of objectification and advocate a preference for person first language at the level of public discourse (e.g., “person with a substance use disorder” versus “substance abuser,” “alcoholic,” or “addict”).
Disclosure and Retraction Sometimes recovery status is later retracted as one reframes his or her personal story, deleting addiction and recovery as meaningful categories within the story. Addiction recovery, like recovery from other life-threatening conditions, can constitute a transitory or enduring identity, as a recovery is integrated into a person’s overall sense of self.
Disclosure as Social Advancement Recovery disclosure can be a way of asserting a new identity for social/occupational advancement–what Goffman refers to as “making a profession of their stigma” (p. 27). A recovery identity may also be falsely embraced and visibly worn as a means of transcending an otherwise stained identity (e.g., explanation for criminal or immoral behavior) or for social advancement (e.g., exaggeration/fabrication of addiction/recovery story when new opportunities are linked to that status).
Collective Disclosure Recovery disclosure can occur as a personal act, but it can also occur as a collective act, as happens each year in public recovery celebration events in the U.S. and in other countries. Rituals of collective disclosure can exert a profound influence on recovery identity and embolden social disclosure of recovery status outside of such events.
Survival of Stigma Surviving a discredited condition/status can be a meaningful source of strength, potentially allowing one a depth of experience, character, and quality of life that might otherwise not have been possible without such challenges. Lecturing at the 1945 Yale School of Alcohol Studies, AA co-founder Bill Wilson referred to this as “the sublime paradox of strength coming out of weakness.”

Tuesday, October 21st, 2014 Focus: I say yes to taking charge and making healthy decisions for my body, my life, myself.

Available at ITUNES and Amazon

Lebish and Grinnell CD
“A Long Time Comin”


We constantly make choices. Will we have that next cigarette, or next whatever? Will we say no, or simply let our habits and addictions rule our lives? Are we the boss of our lives? Can we say no to external forces?

We can, but it’s up to us to constantly make the choices that support our well-being, our health, our peace of mind. The thing to remember is that there is always a next time. Even if we don’t say no one time doesn’t mean that we can’t choose differently another time.

You always have another opportunity (and another and another) to just say yes to taking charge and making healthy decisions for your body, your life, yourself.

Excerpted from the article:
Just Say No! Just Say Yes! The Power of the Word
Written by Marie T. Russell.

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RECOMMENDED BOOK OF THE DAY

A Book of Miracles: Inspiring True Stories of Healing, Gratitude, and Love
by Dr. Bernie S. Siegel.

Bernie Siegel first wrote about miracles when he was a practicing surgeon. Compiled during his more than thirty years of practice, speaking, and teaching, the stories in these pages are riveting, warm, and belief expanding. Without diminishing the reality of pain and hardship, the stories show real people turning crisis into blessing by responding to adversity in ways that empower and heal. They demonstrate what we are capable of and show us that we can achieve miracles as we confront life’s difficulties.

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